Travelling On A budget – Tips By 40+ Travel Bloggers From Around The World

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If you run a quick search on Google, you will find a number of posts with results like 10 best tips to save money while traveling OR 7 important ways to save money on your trip.

While these lists are comprehensive, you may feel like knowing what other travel bloggers suggest? And this may lead to the conventional thought of:

Traveling On Budget seems difficult!

If you think so then check out this post full of tested tips compiled up by Jovago Myanmar with help of 40+ awesome travel bloggers.

Aileen

Website: www.iamaileen.com

Jovago Myanmar

Research for the FREE stuff that you can do.

YES, there are always an array of free things that you can do in a foreign city in order to keep your travel expenses low.

City passes are often a great bundled deal that not only gives you free and discounted access to various activities but it could also give you free rides for your destination’s public transportation.

But other than city passes, make sure that you research online the FREE things that you can do for your trip — or you could also simply talk to the locals to ask for tips.

Some of the many things you can experience: free walking tours, free festivals, free concerts, free museum days, etc.

Alice Teacake

Website: www.teacaketravels.com

Jovago Myanmar

For the best budget flight booking hacks, make sure you book your flight in an incognito window. Companies keep track of what destinations you’re interested in and will bump up the price a little if you book in an open window.

If you can’t afford a flight, how about considering a staycation?

Sometimes traveling in your own country can show you so many delights you didn’t realize existed…and they’re right on your doorstep. Want a room upgrade? Check in late.

Staff will be much more willing to give you a better room if they know the top rooms are definitely not going to be taken at that point.

Alyssa Ramos

Website: www.www.mylifesamovie.com

Jovago Myanmar

One sure way to save money while traveling is to grocery shop at local markets instead of always eating at restaurants.

Even if you’re staying somewhere you can’t cook, you can still always buy sandwich ingredients, plus small things like water (and wine  ) are always significantly cheaper at markets!

For more riskier money-saving attempts, you can do what I do and book hotels the day before or day-of, because most will offer big discounts or upgrades just to fill the rooms!

Andi

Website: www.misadventureswithandi.com

Andi

I enjoy eating, particularly discovering local cuisine while I am traveling.  There are still ways to stay in your budget, even if you are a greedy gourmand like I am!

One way I’ve saved money over the years is by eating at restaurants for lunch rather than dinner.  Oftentimes, the menu is nearly the same but less expensive. I always feel like the staff is friendlier, more at ease with serving a lunch crowd rather than dinner.

Saving money on dinner allows me to take those extra dollars (Euros, Yen, etc.) and buy local ingredients to create my own picnic.

I love seeking out local farmer’s markets or food stores and picking and choosing here and there to create a delicious meal that I can either enjoy in a park, by the water or even in my hotel if I’ve walked all day.

Lastly, I almost never eat breakfast in the hotel. I try to find a local café or bistro and grab a coffee and local pastry and watch how the people of the particular city I am visiting wake up to start their day.

I love to people watch and this a great, and inexpensive, way to do it!

Annemarie

Website: www.travelonthebrain.net

Anna

My tip for budget-friendly travel is to be flexible and think outside of the main tourist areas. If you have the luxury to travel during non-holiday times, particularly off-season, you will easily find good deals and affordable prices.

Also, don’t be afraid to stay a little away from the center for a more local touch and cheaper accommodation. Get an apartment to save on meals and make your own.

Ask locals for fresh food markets, supermarkets and other well frequented spots that aren’t touristy and overpriced. If you want to get the full rundown of how to make any trip super money savvy, you can check out my free mini-course on budget travel.

Annette

Website: www.bucketlistjourney.net

Annette

A tip that has saved me hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars over the years is searching for alternative routes when booking a flight.

While sometimes it is cheapest to fly directly into the hub of your destination country, many times it is more cost effective to fly into a nearby airport and then hop on public transportation to your final destination.

It may also be cheaper to fly into a different country altogether! When I am heading to Europe I often fly into Zurich or London, as it is typically the cheapest flight from my home airport, San Francisco International. Then I pop onto a discount European flight to reach my final destination.

Anthony

Website: www.thetraveltart.com

Anthony

In terms of having the money to travel, the way to do this is that a budget needs to be set based on how long you will be away for and where.

Once this amount is determined, regularly contribute the amount of money you need per week into a separate account over X number of weeks – calculate your savings time/schedule and stick to it.

Be ruthless. Cut whatever you don’t need and add more to your account if possible until you reach your required budget.

Becky & Gray

Website: www.globalgrasshopper.com

Becky

Always stay away from expensive tourist zones where prices of food and drink can be twice the price and quality isn’t all that great either.

Just going one block one away can make a huge difference in price and the food will be far more authentic.

Embrace the local culture and eat in a quiet back street French bistro or scour a street market for that perfect $1 Pad Thai.

Carlo Dominguez

Website: www.travelosyo.com

Carlo

One of the best ways to save money while traveling is to live like a local and this is more than just saving money. It will give you a better experience and understanding on the way other people live their life.

A good example is my travel in Thailand. Traveling to Thailand is cheap and you could make it even cheaper by doing it the local way. Instead of eating in a restaurant, eat on the street.

Bangkok is known for its street food. I believe that you can find more delicious food on the street of Bangkok compared to most of the restaurants in the city. And of course, it will save you a lot of money.  Go where most of the local eat, for sure it will never go wrong.

And of course, it will save you a lot of money.  Go where most of the local eat, for sure it will never go wrong.

Another way is transportation. If you think it’s walkable, choose to walk rather than taking a cab or bus. In Thailand, most people take the sky train or MRT to beat the traffic.

Though it’s efficient, I find it expensive. Alternatively, if you’re not in a hurry, take a bus. It’s way cheaper than the train, you can also take a motorbike, or a water taxi these are being used by locals and it’s incredibly cheap.

When you travel around it is best to be with the locals, they know where is the best place in their place. They could also help you to get discounts if you’re planning to do shopping.

Claudia Tavani

 Website: www.myadventuresacrosstheworld.com

Claudia

My biggest tip to keep travel expenses in the budget is to book tours and activities locally.

The typical mistake most travelers make is to book everything online before going on a trip, in order to save time once they are actually traveling. The idea is that if they do so, once they are traveling they can dedicate 100% of their time to fully exploring and experiencing a place.

However, I have often found out that tours bought online at times cost over 3 times more than when bought directly with a local agent.

This is what happened to me when I went to Vietnam. I had spent $140 USD to buy a tour of the Mekong Delta online so that I didn’t have to bother to look for it once in Saigon.

I eventually found out that other people on the tour who had bought it locally only spent $40 for the exact same services. It surely was frustrating, especially given the poor quality of the tour.

In any case, booking in person gives the possibility of asking questions to have a clear idea of what services and options are available, and to buy the tour that perfectly matches our needs.

Craig and Linda

Website: www.indietravelpodcast.com

Craig and Linda

Travelling can be cheaper than staying at home — it certainly is in our case! The trick is to spend less on the big expenses like transport and accommodation. We do a lot of housesitting; couch surfing and using AirBnb can cut accommodation costs down too.

With regards to transport — the longer you stay away, the better value those long flights are! Of course, keep your eye out for sales and special deals, and be flexible on dates to get the best prices.

Finally, a daily budget helps keep expenses in check. We use the Trail Wallet app to record our expenses, and if we overspend one day, we’ll spend less the next.

Enrico & Zuzana

Website: www.travelhysteria.com

Enrico & Zuzana

Our main tip on how to save money while traveling is “Don’t take a taxi without taximeter!”. Especially in the biggest cities, taxi drivers are trying to scam you with incredibly high fares for a few kilometres. Always ask the driver to turn on the taximeter before starting the ride. There are two alternatives to the taxi, though:

Always ask the driver to turn on the taximeter before starting the ride. There are two alternatives to the taxi, though:

1- Use the public transport, that is everywhere really cheap. For example in Bangkok, the public buses are often for free, and the local boats are the most convenient way to move around.

2- Download and start using Uber. The famous app can save your life! The prices of the rides are really good and you’ll be sure that no one will scam you.

Federico Arrizabalaga

Website: www.maitravelsite.com

Federico Arrizabalaga

The biggest expenses when traveling are always transportation and accommodation, hence the less you move around the cheaper it will be to travel.

But what fun would that be?

If you’re on your own public transportation will save you a good amount of money; it seldom makes sense financially to rent a car.

Don’t splurge on accommodation, after all, you really only want the place to spend the night in and get some sleep. Does a nice desk or wall painting make a difference?  Finally, stay away from little expenses that add up.

Alcohol, cigarettes and similar expenses aren’t really needed and after some time will dig a deep hole in your pocket.

Francis Tapon

Website: www.francistapon.com

Francis

Pack minimalist camping gear. Wise travelers advise you to carry as little as possible, and they’re right. However, a lightweight sleeping bag, pad, and tarp will weigh about 2 kg (4.4 pounds). Having an emergency shelter allows you to travel freely and take advantage of last second offers, including last second couch surfing

Having an emergency shelter allows you to travel freely and take advantage of last second offers, including last second couch surfing hosts, people you meet on the street who invite you to their homes or hotel deals.

If you don’t have an affordable housing option, you can always camp and save money!

 

Giulia

Website: www.travelreportage.com

Budget Traveling

​It’s important for me to keep my travel expenses in budget as I personally prefer to travel for as long as possible, cutting on unnecessary luxury etc.

Accommodation is the biggest expense especially as a solo traveller, therefore I choose hostels over hotels, alternating dorms and private rooms for the occasional comfort / privacy / good sleep etc.

I consider myself lucky as I don’t drink so I spend zero money in bars and pubs. Also, I am not really a foodie so I don’t look for expensive restaurants – street food is perfect for me together with the supermarkets – eating can’t get any cheaper than that!

Lastly, in order to afford expensive trips such as the one I had last year (one month in Argentina, around 3.000 Euros overall) or my upcoming trip (South Africa + Botswana, around 4.000 Euros overall) I start planning early and pay little by little: flights first, then activities, then accommodation. It takes me up to ​9 months to pay for everything, that way I don’t feel like I am spending that much, also because I could never afford to buy everything at once.

Well, I hope this helps. Safe travels!

Henrik

Website: www.henriktravel.com

Henrik

One of the best money-saving travel tips is to sign up for newsletters of low-cost airlines and book a lot of tickets when they have promotions if you can work out the dates.

Another of the best money-saving travel tips is to look for low-cost buses instead of taking the train and flying.

Jamie Patterson

Website: www.travlrblog.com

Jamie Patterson

I’ll have to admit, I’m a natural-born foodie. No matter what I’m doing, or where I’m going, somehow the conversation comes back to food and drink.  I’m not all that unique in this regard, either. As any traveling gourmand will tell you, most vacations are planned around the destination’s culinary potential.

Cheap flights to northern Italy? Then Focaccia and a glass of Barolo it is. Switzerland, perhaps? How about sharing a Fondu, or better yet – Raclette? Even among regular travelers, food is important. This is why people value breakfast over most hotel amenities – including Wi-Fi.

But, it’s not rare for lunch and dinner to add up to the same cost of the daily accommodation. So, how do you fill one’s gullet, sample new bevies, and save?

Glad you asked.

Prep. If headed on a road trip, an hour of prep time and a cooler can go a long way. Pack water bottles for the road instead of buying them for exorbitant gas-station prices.

Next, bring along a couple of glasses, so that you can purchase a local wine varietal or 6-pack of craft beer from a grocer; saving on restaurant mark up.

When you’ve arrived at your destination, try cutting back on the number of times that you eat out and resort to your cooler instead.

Bring snacks like homemade carrot-nut muffins (filling and healthy), apples, celery, cheese, sandwiches, and chips (for that evening wine session nestled in the hotel’s plush wing-backed chairs).

When you do hit up a restaurant, try to order less from the main menu, and more from the appetizers – and share them if possible. Not only is this less expensive, but you’ll get to try different tastes without bursting at the seams or emptying the wallet.

Flying instead? Buy drinks after security, but before boarding the plane. As for snacks, there’s nothing wrong with bringing a sandwich and sweets onboard.

It may not make a huge difference the first time, but if you get in the habit, the savings add up fast.

Janet

Website: www.journalistontherun.com

Janet

My best tip for keeping travel expenses within budget is to choose where you stay carefully. You can save a lot of money by staying in hostels, using Airbnb or even Couchsurfing – which means you get to stay for free and make new friends along the way.

Hostels are great because they are cheap and they often have a free breakfast, sometimes give out free drinks and in many of the ones I stayed at in Mexico they even gave backpackers a free dinner. You can also buy groceries and cook your own food in the hostel to save money. There’s also a website called Trusted Housesitters which lets you stay in

You can also buy groceries and cook your own food in the hostel to save money. There’s also a website called Trusted Housesitters which lets you stay in

There’s also a website called Trusted Housesitters which lets you stay in people’s home for free if you mind their pets!

Janice

Website: www.solotravelerworld.com

Janice

To come in on budget requires some advance planning. I use a budgeting spreadsheet that you can get in my post How to Plan Your Solo Travel Budget – On Any Budget.

I like to book budget, mid-range and luxury accommodation in the same trip so that the average price is not high but I’ve also enjoyed a bit of luxury.

I always make sure I have a slush fund in the budget so that I can make spontaneous purchases.

Jeremy

Website: www.theworldorbust.com

Jeremy

Don’t be afraid to negotiate prices. Sure, you can’t haggle the price of a bowl of pasta on a menu at a restaurant, but if you’re taking a tour, setting up private transport, or even hotels, just ask if they can do a little better on the price and almost always you will get a discount.”

Jo

Website: www.indianajo.com

Jo

My biggest tip for saving money while traveling is to focus on the big spends like flights and accommodation – if you can get a great deal on these, you’re less likely to have to scrimp on the rest of your trip.

For flights, being flexible (airports, dates, flight times, airlines and even cities) and using a flight comparison site is the best way to find deals. For accommodation, do your research.

Hostels with private rooms (or dorms) can be a great budget option and if you want a hotel, there are also comparison sites to help you. Peer-to-peer options like Couchsurfing and Airbnb can be great alternatives, too.

It may require a bit more research but if you can get a good discount on flights and rooms, you won’t have to worry so much whether you can afford that extra $1 taco on your trip.

Joan

Website: www.againstthecompass.com

Joan

As a long-term, overland traveler, I always try to be very careful with money, as I don’t know how long am I going to travel for. After 8 years of traveling, I’ve developed a series of skills and, today, I can say that I spend far less money than when I first started traveling. These are some of my most valuable budget tips:

1 – There’s always a cheaper way to get to places. Either because they are lazy or just because they don’t know how to do it, travelers use to get to places, within the country, in a touristic tour or by taxi.

If there is something I learned during my years of travel is that, 98% of the time, you can get to a place by public transportation, especially in developing countries. In these countries, a large number of people can’t afford to buy a car, so public buses literally go everywhere.

However, bus schedules are not published anywhere, which means that you need to find your way by asking people. Don’t worry, is not as difficult as it sounds. When I was in Kenya, I managed to get to the doors of the Maasai Mara National Park by public transport and I ended up paying 50% less than those who booked their tour from Nairobi.

2 – Never book any tour in advance. A large number of travelers prefer to book a tour or hire their local guide before arriving at their destination.

Some of them claim that they are afraid of not finding anyone once they arrive at their destination. Well, the truth is that any tour company which offers their services online will always offer them offline as well.

In addition, once you are at your final destination, you will find plenty of tour companies which cannot be found on the internet. To be honest, I never go on a tour except for when I am forced to. For example, on long mountain treks (more than 5-7 days), for safety reasons, I prefer to hire a local guide.

However, I will never ever book one in advance as, in my experience, the price will always be 50% higher than if I find one when I am at my destination.

3 – Eat in restaurants without a signboard. When you are in a foreign country where nobody speaks English, it is very tempting to enter restaurants with a fancy signboard and an English menu.

However, these restaurants tend to be 30% more expensive than the average.

When I travel, I always try to eat in eateries with no visible signboard, where only local people eat. How do I order? I look at what people are eating and order the best-looking dish.

4 – Always ask for the price first and, if applicable, bargain. When you are in a foreign country, never, ever buy anything without asking for the price first.

Remember that, as a tourist, you might be charged double. Furthermore, in some countries, bargaining is part of the culture. Sometimes, you might think that the seller is trying to rip you off but actually, he is expecting you to haggle, as even the locals do it. Always try to bargain in markets, bazaars, taxis and even in some guest houses.

 Jonny

Website: www.dontstopliving.net

Jonny

Traveling at Night.

To save money while traveling I suggest that you try to travel overnight as much as you can. Night trains, long haul flights, night buses.

Alternatively, book early morning flights and spend the previous night in the airport, again saving money. It is amazing how much money you will save in a year if you travel this way, spending 30 – 60 nights traveling instead of sleeping in hostels, hotels etc.

This way you not only save a night of accommodation expenses, but you often get free meals and drinks and you also save time, as traveling in daylight means you are losing time you could have been sightseeing.

Kim

Website: www.escapetheconfines.com

Kim

Search for discount coupons and vouchers online. Not only you get the best deals, but you also get to budget your money ahead of time. Searching for these promotions has saved me a lot of money during my travels.

Kristen

Website: www.hopscotchtheglobe.com

Kristen

My number one tip for keeping within your travel budget is to find out the best places from those who live there. Eat where the locals eat and do as the locals do.

Touristy areas are going to market to tourists and therefore jack up the prices. If you want to save money plus get an authentic experience, ask the locals for their recommendations and go there.

There are also so many ways to enjoy your time in a new place without spending any money.

For example, there are free walking tours in nearly every major European city. You can play outside, explore parks and hiking trails, people watch or buy groceries at a local market.

All of these experience have made up a big part of my best travel memories. I actually find that when I’m on a tighter budget, I have the most fun.

Kristin Addis

Website: www.bemytravelmuse.com

Kristen Addis

Do you as the locals do. You were the locals eat, take local transportation, and stay in smaller, locally owned places as often as you can when you travel. You will save so much money that way! Plus you will have a more authentic experience.

Lash

Website: www.lashworldtour.com

Lash

Here are a few tips I can recommend to independent budget travelers for saving money on accommodation:

  1. If you stay in one hostel or hotel for one week or longer, ask for a discount. Many places are happy to offer at least 10% discount. If not, well at least you checked.
  1. To find hostels in your destination, search on the hostel booking sites. There you can get names, info, prices, photos, and reviews of leading hostels there. But don’t book through the sites. Instead, search online for the hostels you like; visit their websites and then contact them directly about reservations. You’ll save money and the hostels also appreciate the direct bookings.
  1. Search online under locally used words for cheap accommodations. For example, in Mexico, they use ‘hospedaje’ for hostel and homestay type accommodations. Searching under ‘hospedaje’ will usually bring up places that don’t show up under ‘hostel’ or ‘backpackers’…and will usually also be in low, local prices.
  1. If you’re a traveling couple or friends, it usually doesn’t cost more for a private room than for 2 beds in a hostel. You can get a private room all to yourselves instead!
  1. In some places, you can find AirBnB rooms for the same price as a bed in a hostel dorm! So go ahead and check out AirBnB as well as hostels.

Martien Janssen

Website: www.travelimagez.com

Jovago Pakistan

There’s many things of course you can do to keep things within your budget. But there’s 3, maybe to not so obvious ones, that I’d like to mention. First is research.

By doing research you can find out what the cheapest time of year is, avoid high season, it’s crowded and more expensive. You’ll have a better time and find cheaper deals when traveling in low season. The dry season might be ‘the best season’, but with the changing climate, often you have the worst weather in that ‘dry season’, and the best weather in that ‘wet season’. Seasons are shifting.

Do your research to find out what a cheap (but still good, check reviews of course) place to stay is, where the cheap eateries are, where you book cheap tours, transport, etc. There’s so many blogs out there with these kind of tips. Without doing that research and just going with the first option you come across, you will not have the best deal. And no matter what, try to haggle, in many countries it’s simply the way it works.

Next, don’t travel too much. People tend to cram a whole country in a few weeks, they spend a lot of time on transport, spend a lot of money on it.

Yes you’ll see more locations, but you won’t necessarily see more, you’ll actually see less, because you’re sitting on buses, boats and planes instead of exploring new places. Also traveling isn’t cheap, so you spend a lot of money on that.

By staying somewhere longer, you get to know the place, feel it, experience more of it, get to know the people better, find the cheaper places to eat etc. And also if you stay somewhere longer you can get a discount on your accommodation, bike rentals etc.

If you stay somewhere for a short time, you’ll obviously go visit the highlights, they’re the most expensive. And be honest, the highlights are often disappointing. You’ve seen the gorgeous photos of photographers that manage to capture the places at the best time and light of the day, with few people.

When you get there, it is very crowded, it’s not as nice as the photo made it look, you can’t get the shots your after etc. By staying somewhere longer you end up visiting the less-known places, find those ‘hidden gems’, discover things most people don’t, they’re often cheaper or even free. You’ll have a more genuine experience by staying somewhere longer, and the biggest win isn’t even that you’ve saved more money.

Last one. Never go with anyone that approaches you. As soon as you arrive at an airport, you’ll have many people offering you a ride to town. Those are the worst, they will rip you off badly. If you’ve done your research, you should already know what the price should be.

But if you haven’t, get a meter taxi, preferably at the Departure area, no Arrivals. Or order a Uber/Grab, but keep in mind that they’re illegal at some countries.

Usually anyone that approaches you with a good deal, ‘my friend’, is the one that is trying give you the worst deal. No matter what they offer. Ask at your accommodation for tips of where to go. Or simply shop around.

Megan

Website: www.mappingmegan.com

Megan

Walking is our top tip for saving money while traveling and sticking to a budget, as transportation costs add up fast, and much of the time these are expenses that people overlook when planning a travel budget. But walking is free, and many city destinations will be easy enough to navigate on foot.

Have an up-to-date map on hand, get to know the language enough that you can understand street signs or possibly ask for directions if you have to. Not only is it cheaper than the constant taxi rides, you get to see a side of your destination you would miss.

Not only is it cheaper than the constant taxi rides, you get to see a side of your destination you would miss.

An extension of this tip is to make use of pedal-power to get around. Many cities offer bike rentals, with pick-up and drop-off locations, quicker than walking and still much less expensive than other forms of inner city transport.

Melvin

Website: www.traveldudes.org

Melvin

Actually, it’s quite simple. You should know your total budget and subtract the flight costs right away. Then find out what kind of budget you have left for each day. With that amount, you know how much you could spend for accommodation, meals, activities, and transport.

Then find out what kind of budget you have left for each day. With that amount, you know how much you could spend for accommodation, meals, activities, and transport.

It’s easy to find out costs of each destination. Just check out a few hotels and restaurants online and you’ll find the prices. I usually go a bit higher with the costs to expect and I also make sure that I can spend a bit more than my first total budget for a trip. In the

I usually go a bit higher with the costs to expect and I also make sure that I can spend a bit more than my first total budget for a trip. In the end it’s important to set priorities where you would like to spend a bit more.

I usually find a good mix between budget & luxury for each trip. That includes accommodation and also restaurants. Important is that you have fun and do as much as possible. When you are back, you will remember the experiences you had and not about the money you

When you are back, you will remember the experiences you had and not about the money you have spend.

Michael Turtle

Website: www.timetravelturtle.com

Michael

My number tip to save money is really simple – it’s walking. Any time there is a chance to walk rather than get a taxi or a bus or a subway, then I do it. And each time I do that I save a little bit of money.

When you start to add it all up, it could be $10 or $20 a day. That means more than $100 a week or up to $500 a month. That’s a great saving for something that also makes you healthier and lets you see more of the local life of the places you’re visiting!

Michela

Website: www.rockytravel.net

Rocky

“Keeping expenses in your budget is likely to be a big challenge for every budget conscious traveler. When traveling it’s easy to indulge yourself with extra treats that can quickly drain your budget.

My rule no. 1 for keeping expenses within budget is through accurate travel planning. The more thoroughly you have planned your holiday the easier it will be for you to keep control of your expenses.

I know that’s easier said than done. A good way to keep your expenditure within the control is budgeting for your daily expenses in a smart way like a local would do.

My tip is to limit eating out: Instead, try to prepare your own meals by shopping at food markets and groceries.This will allow you not to overspend and keep the money for the planned activities and tours.

And by doing so you may be able to save money for a little extra adventure too.

Moreover by choosing sustainable ways of getting around, like walking, biking or using public transportation and shared economy it will also help you keep your expenses within budget.”

Nancy

Website: www.ensquaredaired.com

Nancy

It’s a misconception to think that traveling has to be expensive because it doesn’t have to be! My biggest tip to keeping travel expenses within your budget is to create a budget, track your spend while on the road and stick to your budget.

The key to staying within a budget is the preplanning work to avoid unnecessary costs. This step includes starting with a budget!

Creating a budget isn’t just about putting some numbers together, it requires research to give you an idea of what you’ll be spending on the main categories, like flights, accommodations, transportation, food, and activities.

Once you have a notion on the amount of money you can spend in each bucket, the next step is understanding your priorities within each category.

For example, if your budget is $70 a night for accommodations, you will most likely have to choose between staying in a place that has a nice swimming pool that you want to lounge around, or staying at another accommodation that is more convenient for you.

If your budget for food doesn’t allow you to eat out every day, it means you’ll have to plan some time to visit grocery stores to save on meals.

As for activities, every city you stay at will always have free or low-cost activities. Finding these low-cost activities is all in the planning stage.

Lastly, don’t forget to track your spend. All it takes is a quick 5 minutes a day to jot down what you spent so you can have an idea of whether or not you are on point with your budget.

This information will also allow you to make informed decisions, like realizing that maybe you can splurge to eat at that upscale restaurant you’ve been dying to try 🙂

Raluca Belu

Website: www.whisperwanderlust.com

Raluca Belu

I have a list of tricks that I use when I want to save money while traveling, but sometimes it depends on the destination. However, three of these tricks work no matter where I want to go.

  1. In the case of airplane tickets, I do my research to find those days of a week when prices are lower for a certain destination, and then I try to do all sorts of smart combinations. For example, I only buy a one-way ticket from an airline, and then I buy a return ticket with a different airline that has a cheaper flight on my return date. Maybe it sounds hard to believe, but most of the time this is an effective method. Also, when it comes to flights, I try to make the most of my layovers. There are airlines that offer free city tours if the layover is long enough. That’s how I visited Istanbul, for free.
  2. I use public transport in big cities. In New York, for instance, I had saved a lot of money by using the subway, which is very fast and cheap, instead of spending them on taxi, Uber or a rented car.
  3. I never buy lots of souvenirs, and if I do, I never purchase them in the highly touristic places, which are super expensive. I recommend you to always search for souvenirs shops on the outskirts of a city. I assure you can find the same products, away cheaper.

Rhonda

Website: www.albomadventures.com

Rhonda

One of the best ways we have found to stick to our budget is by keeping the daily incidentals in check.

Our strategy begins with choosing affordable accommodations that either include breakfast or have a mini kitchenette.

Either way, we always seek a mini refrigerator in our room. When breakfast is not part of the package, we make our own of local cereals,

We also keep fresh fruit and other snacks in our room refrigerator and frequently pack a lunch on the go. Our aim is to eat only one meal per day in restaurants.

Our aim is to eat only one meal per day in restaurants.

Ric Gazarian

Website: www.globalgaz.com

Ric Gazarian

ATM fees can add up while traveling overseas.  

Some banks add on $5 or $6 fee for every withdrawal. That is why it is critical to have an account with a bank like Charles Schwab or Fidelity Investments.

These banks will reimburse you for any fees that you incur when withdrawing money from another ATM.

This can save you quite a bit of money, and help you save for your next trip!

Sarita

Website: www.bohotraveller.com

Sarita

  1. If I want to stay luxury on a holiday but have a limited budget then I try to stay cheap on all days and just squeeze a day or two preferably last once for a stay in a nice big property. Also, I try to book as much in advance as I can and go on holiday during weekdays, accommodation plus air tickets are cheaper on weekdays.
  2. I personally like to stash savings for my holidays in a separate bank account in recurring deposits. The amount depends on the next holiday I am going on or simply on how much I can spare. This way this amount sort of becomes my budget and I am in a better place to spend a holiday.

 SJ

Website: www.chasingthedonkey.com

Jovago Myanmar

Sleep While You Travel

You can save a good chunk of cash, but choose to sleep while you travel – on the train! Kill two birds with one stone, by planning your distance routes on the train to be overnight. That way you save money on

That way you save money on accommodation and arrived ready for adventure at your new destination with money in your pocket.

Sonja

website: www.migratingmiss.com

Sonja

Tip to keep travel expenses in budget:

I’m always searching for flight deals and accommodation bargains, but probably the biggest expense I find when I’m traveling is the food.

Depending on the country of course, but feeding and hydrating yourself can often take a big chunk out of the budget. If I’m staying somewhere for more than I couple of days I usually try and book accommodation with a kitchen so that I can shop at the local supermarket for some of the basics.

Browsing the supermarket shelves is also a fun local experience to have and I treat it like another top thing to do wherever I go! I also try to only eat a full meal out once a day.

Every destination seems to have their own version of “street food” or a lower cost food item that can sustain you the rest of the time.

In Greece it was gyros, in Italy pizza from a whole in the wall takeout instead of a restaurant, in Sweden cinnamon buns from the bakery. In summary, don’t just walk into the first restaurant you see.

Keep your budget down by shopping locally and finding the local version of street food.

Steven Kreimendahl

Website: www.traveltoblank.com

Jovago Pakistan

When it comes to traveling, the expenses can quickly add up, especially with two of us. Keeping our adventures within a budget allow us to enjoy even more places. To keep our travels in

To keep our travels in budget we follow two simple tips. We buy food at local grocery stores upon arriving and walk the destination whenever possible.

Eating out every meal while traveling can quickly add up.

Instead, we head to the nearest grocery store to stock up on breakfast, lunch and snack foods. To make sure we are still able to try the local cuisine, we plan to eat specific meals, which is already built into our budget.

At the same time we opt to explore each destination by foot, whenever possible. Not only does it save us a bundle on public transportation or private tours, but we believe it is the best way to experience a city.

Walking between the main tourist attractions gives you the opportunity to experience the hidden gems it has to offer. We normally find the coolest spots and best places to eat in a city just by stumbling upon it on our walk.

Suzie Kelsey

Website: www.thewanderinglinguist.com

Suzie Kelsey

You do not need to eat at restaurants while traveling. Go to markets, or even better, go to a local supermarket and buy some ingredients to make your own meal. I survived on home-made sandwiches when traveling Europe.

Turner

Website: www.americantravelblogger.com

Turner

My tip to keep travel costs on a budget is to always try to plan to travel beneath your means. What I mean by this is to book accommodation, for example, on the lower end of your budget if possible.

If you are looking at 4 different Air BnBs, if you think that they are more or less comparable, it is best to pick the less expensive option.

By doing it this way, you will free up more budget for random opportunities that may come up, whether that be an extra local meal or last minute tickets to something.

If you plan beneath your means, you have a much better chance of staying in budget while keeping your options open for spontaneous adventures that may cost money.

Vicki Garside

Website: www.maketimetoseetheworld.com

Vicki Garside

Regarding your post about tips to keep on budget my top tip would be to do lots of research before you go and build your budget based on current prices for day to day accommodation & transport costs alongside activities and excursions that you plan to do.

And carry an emergency fund for those little extras that pop up every now and again.

Victoria Brewood

Website: www.pommietravels.com

Victoria Brewood

To keep within the budget I would recommend having a separate bank account or prepaid card with your spending money on it. This way you don’t check your bank account and suddenly get a shock!

Give yourself a daily spending limit for food, drink, and activities, then try not to spend over that amount. I always use money saving apps such as Skyscanner and Hotel Tonight.

Staying in an AirBnB tends to be cheaper than hotels, plus you can cook your own meals to save money on food in restaurants. Dining out is nice when it’s a special occasion, but you don’t have to do this every night of your trip.

Jovago pays deep gratitude to all the experts who contributed to the roundup post.

Please share if you enjoyed it!

 

9 Comments

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  2. Xander

    July 23, 2017 at 11:29 am

    Thanks for all your travel tips. I lived in Thailand for almost one year and yes, you’re right. eating the street food will save your money.

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